Ritualised Forms

Homage to Contemporary Bullshido

Month: June 2017

A(nother, spurious, incoherent) trope fig leaf over Australia’s economic malaise from the Fairfax 2nd string

As it makes it way gracelessly towards a post journalism future Fairfax is becoming a study in downsizing organisations, between the plethora of last comments from skilled writers who have shaped the way Australians see themselves and the world over a generation, to the desperation resonating exhortations of those still on the books as a guide to how desperate they are to remain thus.

Jess Irvine is one of the latter.  She regularly tees off with incoherent economic diatribes as a sort of backfill spakfilla when Gitto or the Pascoemeter take holidays, and occasionally limbers in with some reasonably pertinent observations on social phenomena (notably housing).  Sadly, todays serve is one of the former – another vacuous incoherent chunder of utter bilge revolving around the economy and labour economics, with a dash of an anti-Union slant.

I don’t have a problem with an anti-Union slant, and for a decade was an industrial relations official on the employer side for some of Australia’s larger employers – so I have seen them carry on with some weird shit.  But that same experience has led me to the view that the reason for the enduring popularity of Unions in some sectors of the economy is that any given management is highly likely to be carrying on with shit which is every bit as weird, and as far as most employees of their workplaces is concerned is likely to be far more pernicious shit in terms of impacting on their conditions, incomes, and the way they do their work.  In many workplaces it takes the form of a fairly vicious form of workplace politics, which can shape everything from hours worked to promotion or training opportunities, to allowances and workplace safety.  Depending on the workplace it can become serious.  And in many of those workplaces joining a Union makes sense as far as an address to those circumstances is concerned, and ultimately joining a Union is just another manifestation of the safety in numbers and organising in response to a threat phenomena – albeit where the threat is management.

And so we come to todays piece which ostensibly takes snippets of the Australian economy as it is, and attempts to make it stand up as an argument for more education to generate more income and then skips around aimlessly describing whatever economic thoughts have come to Jess at the time ……… Continue reading

Monopoly-Capitalists slam faux population ponzi limitations as capital extraction impediments

Global capital elites slam faux population ponzi limitations as capital extraction impediments

Global oligopolists and a leading neo feudalism brand management guru have savaged the federal government’s visa changes, accusing them of being the leading edge in questioning a generations worth of Monopoly-Capitalist mantra which has paved the way to Australia’s economic malaise and suggesting that a nation with a higher foreign born population than any other in the OECD is labelling foreigners unfairly.

Coca-Cola Amatil managing director Alison Watkins, Woodside chief executive Peter Coleman and GE president Geoff Culbert described changes that will further restrict access to Australia’s visa system as hypocritical and retrograde. They also noted that all three ran businesses which focussed on minimising profits in Australia insofar as they related to taxation payments made here, were happiest when their employees in Australia were paid least, and found fresh migrants the the most committed to corporate values and behaviours while being most expendable without complaining about their minimum.

Former World Trade Organisation director Pascal Lamy lashed out at changes spurred by the global populist phenomenon.

 “We have spent 35 years broadening the scope of global trade for the 1% who control more than half the world’s earnings just to extract ever more from the rest, and free trade and importing cheap labour from elsewhere has been our key leverage tool. Just because highly indebted former middle class types are upset about having their pay outcomes offshored or their services undermined by taxation avoiding multinationals, doesn’t mean we shouldn’t look at the upside. Australians shouldn’t underestimate how good this is…..’  Continue reading

MB Radio: Australia’s economy goes foie gras

In the wake of the 2017 Federal Budget and with prices for Australia’s major commodity exporting slumping Gunnamatta spoke with David Llewellyn-Smith and Leith van Onselen about the Australian economy and its key drivers and outlook.  In a wide ranging discussion they cover the role that immigration is currently playing in sustaining Australia’s current economic data, while making little plausible sense for a nation remaining reliant on natural resources, and how this affects Australian politics, policymaking, real estate and infrastructure.

David looks at the dynamics in the iron ore, coal and gas markets, with the implications this has for the budget, and there is a detailed look at the implications of the Adanic coal mine in Queensland and proposals to build an LNG terminal for imports.  Leith explores the 2017 Budget’s reliance on wages meeting extremely optimistic forecasts, which he and David make clear are simply not going to happen, all ultimately leading to Australia expecting a sovereign downgrade, with the implications of this for the Australian economy and currency.

The discussion last approximately 75 Minutes and comes in 3 parts. Continue reading

© 2017 Ritualised Forms

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!